NEWS

  • Raul Toro

WRECK IT RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET: Review




Wreck-It Ralph sequel Ralph Breaks The Internet broadens scope from gaming nostalgia to the online world, and sparse moments of inspired invention between exhaustive product placement. Ralph’s first outing was like by Gen-Xers and Milinials because these generations were able to stroll down gaming memory lane.

Ralph Breaks The Internet starts out on familiar ground inside the arcade power strip hub. Disaster soon strikes, however, when Vanellope von Schweetz’s (Sarah Silverman), physical game has a damaged part that needs to be replaced, it has its plug pulled. This prompts the glitch racer and Ralph to head into the mysterious ‘Wifi’ world to find a the part needed to revive her home.

What follows is a visual landscape combining inventive reimagining’s of internet features and egregious product placement. New charming characters, like the search engine know-it-all and invasive pop-up salesman, are littered between powerhouse buildings with Google, Snapchat and Facebook plastered over the skyline. It leaves Wreck-It Ralph 2 feeling questionable in its intentions. Whereas the first banked on gaming nostalgia to lovingly reference pop culture, here we have attempted satirical swipes with corporate banners looming large in the background. It’s a hard world to escape into without raising eyebrows over its intended audience, especially when portions of the story revolve around cheating ‘Buzztube’ algorithms to become a viral success, which feels bizarrely sophisticated for a family film.

To Ralph Breaks The Internet’s defence, the film does spotlight downsides of this hyper-connected world by delving into comment sections and our constant desires for approval – but it’s far from the film’s highlights. However, that is shadowed by the obvious corporate takeover of the background. In it's most simplification, this movie was just a 2 hour commercial for social media, Disney and it's corporate sponsors. It was subliminally overwhelming and too much was going on behind the scenes that it was tough, as an adult, to keep my focus. It is a "one and done" kind of a movie, not worth the head ache of watching a second time.



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